CSC is now PCSC

As it was initially conceived and planned for all purposes, the Conflict Study Center (CSC) has now been renamed as the Peace and Conflict Studies Center (PCSC). This also reflects the fact that the primary focus of Nepal and Nepali people has now shifted toward consolidation of peace efforts. PCSC believes that all its activities need to be concentrated toward sustainable peace, harmony and security. It is a part of PCSC's support for peace process to provide quality training to highly capable Nepalis to become dedicated professionals in the fields of peace, security and human rights. At the same time, however, PCSC will continue its activities to minimize eruption of conflict and violence and to disseminate information and research findings for resolving conflicts and consolidating peace. PCSC welcomes ideas and suggestions from all quarters that may enable it to contribute more qualitatively in the country's strenuous journey toward peace and security.


The Articles

Nepal’s First Peace Event 2013 with                Prof. Dr. Johan Galtung

Situation Update 107                                           February 9, 2013
Nepal’s First Peace Event 2013 with Prof. Dr. Johan Galtung
Bishnu Pathak, PhD

Although the (re)integration of former combatants of the Maoist Army mostly into the society,  but also a few into the Nepal Army, has partially culminated the peace process, Nepal still faces a number of challenges. The Constituent Assembly (CA) had become defunct on May 27, 2012 without promulgating a new constitution even after four years of its extended tenure. And now, Nepal lacks elected bodies from central to grassroots levels. The debates over identity (ethnicity) based federal structure of the state had raised sharp differences among the mainstream political parties on the model and number of federal states. Besides, the informal power tussle between the President and the Prime Minister created doubts whether the transition to a Federal Democratic Republic would indeed be successful.
The political parties remain divided. Many constitutional authorities, namely Commission for Investigation and Abuse of Authority, Election Commission, Public Service Commission, Courts, etc. are functioning either without the head or members or both. The bureaucracy has largely been paralyzed. A blanket amnesty against the perpetrators of human rights during the decade old armed conflict (February 13, 1996 to November 21, 2006) has been widely condemned. The lack of regular budget in time has almost stopped investment and made it difficult for the donors to disburse their funds.
In order to overcome the protracted deadlock of all the stakeholders such as government authorities, political parties, civil society, academia, and the international community, there is an urgent need to share opinions and have common understanding on the current priorities of the nation to have general election as well as local elections putting behind all the differences. It seems that the experiences of national politicians and their pressure tactics are not enough to resolve the present political impasse. Perhaps an internationally acclaimed person of authority on conflict transformation by peaceful means may ignite the political consensus process amongst the concerned stakeholders and actors of Nepal. In the context, it is natural to have great expectations from the Founding Father of Peace Studies in the world, Professor Dr. Johan Galtung, who is visiting Nepal for the first Peace Event in Kathmandu from February 10th to 18th, 2013.
 

 
Nepal’s First Peace Event 2013 with                Prof. Dr. Johan Galtung
 

Transitional Security

Situation Update 106                                           February 4, 2013
Transitional Security
Bishnu Pathak, PhD

Prime Minister of Nepal said, "Peace process is ended completing the integration of the Maoist Army (MA)" . PM counted it as a major achievement. Same sentence was also said by Nepali Congress, CPN (UML), and other political parties every day previously. Such speaking raised several questions. Is it true that the MA integration a conclusion of Nepal's peace process? Was the (re)integration of MA alone ultimate goal of peace process? What about the investigations to bring the alleged perpetrators under judicial custody of 17,619 who were extrajudicially killed, 1,327 involuntarily disappeared , 1,495 arbitrarily injured, 4,305 disabled, about 9,000 became single women, 1,219 forcefully kidnapped, 78,798 individuals (21,099 families) internally displaced , 11,775 families lost private properties  and so forth on the course of People's War (1996-2006)? Within death tolls alone, Government is responsible to 63 percent and the Maoists are for 37 percent on violations and abuses of IHRL  and IHL . The Transitional Justice Reference Archive recorded over 2,000 incidents of killings  out of the total 9,000 incidents and studies carried out from 30,000 documents . Where are the truth and reconciliation and disappeared commissions which are supposed to form and accomplished their tasks long back? At what position a new federal constitution is?        

 
Transitional Security
 

Principles of Harmony

Situation Update 105                                           December 3, 2012
Principles of Harmony
Bishnu Pathak, PhD                            

Harmony and peace go hand in hand. When peace comes after chaos and bloodshed, there is the need for harmony. Peace is the process for perfection whereas harmony is a perfect relationship. Peace may be experienced alone by a person whereas harmony is a systematic character between two or more persons or parties; harmony is always a plural condition. Peace may be enjoyed alone; harmony is living together peacefully. Peace implies calmness; harmony requires unity.
•    Confucianism: Harmony is the humanistic philosophy of good virtue that is adhered with an essential code of conduct to be followed by a person, a group of people, and the society in all worldly matters. Human beings are imperfect and ever prone to make mistakes, but they also are teachable, improvable, and perfectible through self-cultivation and self-creation. There is a possibility for human error for which a person may be punished for not pursuing the rules. Our society is a community of human beings; the parents have the authority over their children and the employers have the authority over their employees.

 
Principles of Harmony
 

Civil-Military Relations: Theories to Practices

Situation Update 104                                           December 7, 2011
Civil-Military Relations: Theories to Practices
Bishnu Pathak, PhD*
Surendra Uprety**

Abstract


Since its establishment, the United Nations has become a formidable force toward disarmament, demobilization, reinsertion, repatriation, resettlement, rehabilitation, and (re)integration (DDRRRRR) (Pathak: September 13, 2011:3) or disarmament, demobilization, and (re)integration (DDR) of the armed/military forces and the right sizing of military and armed forces as a whole. Advocating Civil Military Relations (CMR), Huntington developed the objective of civilian control theory, encouraging professionalism of the forces and subjective control for the autonomous run of their institution. Janowitz tried to minimize the difference between objective and subjective controls by defending military effectiveness and democratic civilian control, whereas Haltiner pursued political-military theory on the basis of civil, military, and

 
Civil-Military Relations: Theories to Practices
 
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Who we are

Founded in 2006, The Conflict Study Center is comprised of a group of preeminent experts and scholars in related fields united with the vision of a peaceful and fully democratic, inclusive Nepal that upholds the rule of law and respects human rights.

It is committed to the process of conflict transformation through peaceful means, a concept that stands apart from others such as conflict resolution and conflict management in that it seeks to mitigate the underlying causes of conflict by transforming the societal relationships that support violence.

 

Programs

Police Station Visitors’ Week 2011

The Police Station Visitors’ Week (PSVW) 2011 was organized by the ALTUS Global Alliance from October 31 to November 6, 2011. It was a global initiative organized in 21 countries, namely Benin, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Uganda in Africa; Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Nepal, and Pakistan in Asia; Latvia and Russia in Europe; Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru in Latin America; and USA in North America. It covered all the continents stretching from Bangladesh to Brazil, Maldives to Mexico, and Russia to Benin. Altus is a global alliance working across continents with a multicultural perspective to improve public safety and justice. Peace and Conflict Studies Center (PCSC) is one among the local partner organizations of Altus Global Alliance to conduct the PSVW event in Nepal, which was held two times earlier in 2009 and 2010. The event incorporates ten police stations in Kathmandu Valley situated at Balaju, Bouddha, Bhaktapur, Gaushala, Hanumandhoka, Kalimati, Lalitpur, Maharajgung, New Baneswor, and Singhadurbar. During the event, small groups of citizens visit the local police stations to produce comparable scores on five dimensions, namely Community Orientation, Physical Conditions, Equal Treatment (of public without bias based on age, gender, ethnicity, nationality, minority, status, or sexual orientation), Transparency and Accountability, and Detention Conditions. Thus, the police stations are expected to improve their quality of services provided to the civilians in comparison to previous years and to strengthen transparency and accountability of police toward local citizens whom they are supposed to serve, thus promoting their humanitarian standards as well.

For more, please read the following reports:


Police Station Visitors Week 2010 

Between October 18th to 24th 2010, Altus had organized Police Station Visitors’ Week (PSVW) in 21 countries, namely Benin, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Uganda in Africa; Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Nepal, and Pakistan in Asia; Latvia and Russia in Europe; Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru in Latin America; and USA in North America. It tried to cover all the continents stretching from Bangladesh to Brazil, Maldives to Mexico, and Russia to Benin.

Peace and Conflict Studies Center (PCSC), one of the local partner organizations of the Altus Global Alliance for PSVW, had organized the event for the second time in Nepal. The event incorporated ten police stations in Kathmandu Valley situated at Balaju, Bouddha, Bhaktapur, Gaushala, Hanumandhoka, Kalimati, Lalitpur, Maharajgung, New Baneswor, and Singhadurbar.

 In the PSVW event, the visitors observed and assessed through five dimensional objectives, namely Community Orientation, Physical Conditions, Equal Treatment of the Public, Transparency and Accountability, and Detention Conditions. The event was aimed to assess the quality of services delivered in police stations by identifying some of the best practices being used by the police in order to strengthen their accountability toward the local citizens by ensuring national, regional, and international human rights standards.

For more, please read the following reports:

Ctizen-Centric Policing

National Report 

Regional Report 

Global Report 

 

Police Station Visitors Week 2009

Police Station Visitors’ Week (PSVW) was organized from October 26th to November 1st, 2009 by the ALTUS Global Alliance (www.altus.org). In the PSVW event, small teams of residents visited their local police stations in 20 countries to assess certain aspects of the services that they provide to the public.

The Conflict Study Center (CS Center), one of the local partner organizations of the Altus Global Alliance for PSVW, had organized the event for the first time in Nepal, which incorporated ten police stations in Kathmandu Valley situated at Balaju, Bouddha, Bhaktapur, Gaushala, Hanumandhoka, Kalimati, Lalitpur, Maharajgung, New Baneswor, and Singhadurbar.

 

 

 

 

 

National Report

Regional Report

Global Report